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Women’s Rights and Tax Justice: Conference in Bogotá, Colombia

Panaromic view of Bogota

On June 13th, 14th, and 15th, 2017 the Tax Justice Network will be taking part in an important conference of people coming together in Bogotá to discuss the little-understood and under-reported impacts of political decisions on taxation and financial secrecy on women and girls around the world.

Tax justice and gender is a key and developing research and campaigning area for the Tax Justice Network. Our head of tax, human rights and gender Liz Nelson will report back on this fascinating line-up (detailed below) with her take on the event and future steps to protect the futures of half of the world’s population from the damage done to them in environments that are delivering poorly on tax justice.

You can find the details of the conference in Spanish here and it will be livestreamed via this link here.

The conference hashtags are: #TaxJustice4Women17 and #JusticiaFiscalParaMujeres17

Tax Justice and Women’s Rights, global days of action are coming

February 7, 2017   Blog, Gender, Human Rights

The Tax Justice Network is supporting global partners in highlighting the impact of regressive tax policies and financial secrecy on women’s fundamental human rights, something we campaign on and write about. Here’s some information about the #TaxJustice for Women’s Rights Global Days of Action. The dates for your diary are 8-24 March 2017.Women

UN criticises Switzerland and pressure mounts over human rights impacts of tax havens

December 1, 2016   Blog, Gender, Human Rights
We’ve reported before on this blog on the groundbreaking situation whereby Switzerland—ranked number one in the Tax Justice Network’s Financial Secrecy Index – faced tough questions from a U.N. human rights body in Geneva over the toll that its tax and financial secrecy policies take on women’s rights across the globe. Now Switzerland has received strong recommendations from the U.N. Committee mandated to oversee compliance with the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) regarding its role as arguably the world’s leading tax haven. We reproduce the following from the Center for Economic and Social Rights, one of our partners in this highly significant event:

More evidence of the links between tax and inequality

campbell-lusherThe economists Thomas Piketty, Emmanuel Saez, Facundo Alvaredo and Anthony Atkinson have played a big role in helping analyse and popularise the role that tax rate cuts for wealthy folk play in fostering economic inequality, particularly the income shares of the top 1 percent of people compared to everyone else. As they put it in 2013:

“The evolution of top tax rates is strongly negatively correlated with changes in pre-tax income concentration.”

Their findings have of course been attacked, not least by certain players keen for taxes on wealthy people to stay low.

Now there’s a new US-focused study by Douglas Campbell and Lester Lusher, called Drivers of Inequality: Trade Shocks versus Top Marginal Tax Rates. It seeks to check on these findings:

Why is the CEO of IKEA Switzerland head of a UN panel on gender?

Simona Scarpaleggia, CEO of IKEA Switzerland

Simona Scarpaleggia, CEO of IKEA Switzerland

On March the UN Secretary-General’s High-Level Panel on Women’s Economic Empowerment held their inaugural meetingThe panel:

intends to put women’s economic empowerment at the top of the international agenda, including by defining actions to speed up progress under the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.” 

Gender responses and gender impact are clearly seen as key ways to anchor the success of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. And we’re pleased that this is happening. But there is a jarring note.

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