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Review of 2016

December 31, 2016   Blog
2016: a year of fireworks (photo CC)

2016: a year of fireworks (photo CC)

2016 was the year when the world underwent profound political change. Most notably there were a series of political earthquakes in the US and Europe, with the election of Donald Trump and the decision of the UK to exit the European Union.

Going into 2017 these changes look likely to have a deep and lasting impact on tax policy and the distribution of wealth.

Podcast: Iceland: offshorisation, collapse and recovery. What are the lessons?

October 20, 2016   Blog, Regular Features

In the October 2016 Tax Justice Network podcast: we look at the offshorisation of Iceland’s economy, its collapse and recovery. What are the lessons? Also, Brazil adds Ireland to its tax haven black list and Panama threatens anyone who dares call it a tax haven with a new law…plus more scandal and unique analysis you won’t find anywhere else. Produced by Naomi Fowler for the Tax Justice Network and featuring Sigrun Davidsdottir, journalist, blogger and podcaster, journalist Ingólfur Sigfússon and John Christensen of the Tax Justice Network.

Quote of the day – the future of tax havens

September 30, 2016   Blog, Corruption, Quotations, Secrecy

stiglitzFrom Joseph Stiglitz, writing in Vanity Fair:

“It will not be long before those nations that opt to continue with old-style secrecy will be labeled pariah states and be cut off from the global financial system.”

New and abusive games will continue to emerge to fill the vacuum left by old-style secrecy — including new forms of opacity — but he’s certainly onto something.

 

The article is a testament to Panama’s “commitment” to eliminate crime and secrecy from its financial sector.

Hat tip: Links.

OECD threatens Bahamas with blacklisting, Bahamas wilts

The Bahamas approach to transparency

The Bahamas on transparency

The Spanish newspaper El Mundo is running an article in Spanish, whose headline translates as “If Bahamas goes on like this, it will go onto the G20 blacklist” – and the text in quote marks comes from Pascal Saint-Amans, head of tax at the OECD, the club of rich countries.

The Bahamas has been in the news recently: first, we wrote a scathing blog about how the Bahamas was a big hole in global efforts to build transparency, refusing to participate effectively in the OECD’s incoming Common Reporting Standard to share banking information across border. Very soon afterwards, an article appeared in The Economist whose subheading “The Bahamas cocks a snook at the war on tax-dodgers” said it all — and it received a fusillade of angry responses from Bahamas media. Then, a few days later, a series of “BahamasLeaks” international articles appeared in the media, co-ordinated by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ,) confirming Bahamas’ role as a turntable for dirty money.

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