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Half measures mean Mauritius will continue to be a tax haven for the developing world

July 12, 2017   Africa, Blog, Tax Havens, Tax Treaties

There was news this week that Mauritius has signed the Multilateral Convention to Implement Tax Treaty Related Measures to Prevent Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (MLI). This is an initiative from the OECD to allow countries to take measures designed to stop tax avoidance by multinational companies and put them into their existing network of tax treaties without renegotiating those treaties.

This is a particularly important measure for a countries like Mauritius. Mauritius has a wide network of tax treaties with African and South Asian countries allowing it to act as a conduit for capital to slip tax freely between the West and the developing world. This is commonly called treaty shopping.

So, the signing of the MLI by Mauritius should be seen as good news. Well, not quite. The MLI does not change the relationship between the signatory and all other countries that have a tax treaty with the signatory. Jurisdictions which are not part of the MLI are not included, and even within the MLI jurisdictions can chose not to modify tax treaties with others in the system. This happens through the publication of each country’s ‘preferences’.

A closer look at Mauritius’s ‘preferences’ shows that a number of vitally important treaty relationships are not covered by the jurisdiction joining the MLI, leaving a number of developing countries vulnerable to companies using Mauritius to shift profits in an attempt to avoid tax.

We have been through the list of Mauritius’s ‘preferences’ in the MLI and Mauritius’s existing treaty network. The jurisdictions which currently have a treaty relationship with Mauritius but are not covered by the MLI are as follows:

Australia Botswana Egypt
India Malaysia Mozambique
Namibia Nepal Pakistan
Bangladesh China Rwanda
Senegal Singapore Sri Lanka
Thailand Tunisia Uganda
Zambia Zimbabwe

Countries which are not covered by the MLI or do not match in terms of these preferences have to renegotiate their treaties on a bilateral basis to include clauses which prevent the tax abuse. Here things can get complicated too, as there are a range of anti-avoidance measures available to countries, some better than others. In one key area – the anti-treaty abuse rule – an effective option is to apply a “principle purpose test”. (PPT) This test denies the benefits of a tax treaty if one of the principle purposes of a transaction was to gain that treaty benefit. Mauritius has accepted this test as an interim measure in the countries it will implement the MLI with.

However, in bi-lateral negotiations it has said it prefers the limitation of benefit rule, which applies a large number of more technical criteria to the parties completing a transaction and denies treaty benefits to parties which do not meet those tests. Those tests can be a local ownership requirement, for example.

A limitation of benefits rule is much more complicated to administer than than a PPT test, which causes difficulties for developing countries.

Finally, through the MLI system a country does not need to implement all of the anti-avoidance provisions which form part of the MLI. As well as choosing which countries the MLI applies to, a contracting party can also express reservations on specific policy areas which it does not want to implement. Mauritius has a great deal of reservations about MLI provisions, including on measures such as strengthening capital gains tax from the sale of participations in domestic companies (article 9), the transfer of dividends (article 8), and provisions to prevent tax abuse of income from permanent establishments in third countries (article 10), and the artificial avoidance of permanent establishment status (articles 12 and 13).

So whilst Mauritius (and others) may celebrate the signing of the MLI as a great work of spin for this tax haven island, the weakness of the system still allows this jurisdiction to create significant problems for its neighbours in Africa and South Asia.

G20: Pressure rising on tax haven USA

Whilst the eyes of the world focused on the isolation of the US from the ‘G19’ position on climate change, something remarkable played out elsewhere in the process. Following closely the common EU position that we highlighted a few days ago, the G20 communique devotes important space to tax justice.

It’s so good we quote it in full below. But the key point is in our added italics: the EU (and presumably others) have managed to get the US to sign up to the new international standard for automatic, multilateral exchange of tax information, the Common Reporting Standard (CRS).

The US is currently the only financial centre of any size not to sign up to the CRS.

Further on in the text the communiqué threatens sanctions against countries which do not meet the agreed international standards on tax transparency which include adoption of the CRS. So has the US given up on the opaque road marked ‘Tax Haven USA’?

The logic of the communiqué is clear. If the OECD is serious about enforcing international standards of tax transparency, it must blacklist the US if it fails to adopt the CRS before 2018. This will pave the way for other countries to put in place sanctions against US banks, forcing compliance. Whether the OECD will have the political space, or the guts to do that to its biggest member, is another question altogether. But it’s now clear that the EU is promoting the CRS as the standard it expects the US to reach. The EU blacklisting process will also be watched with interest.

International Tax Cooperation and Financial Transparency: We will continue our work for a globally fair and modern international tax system and welcome international cooperation on pro-growth tax policies. We remain committed to the implementation of the Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) package and encourage all relevant jurisdictions to join the Inclusive Framework. We look forward to the first automatic exchange of financial account information under the Common Reporting Standard (CRS) in September 2017. We call on all relevant jurisdictions to begin exchanges by September 2018 at the latest. We commend the recent progress made by jurisdictions to meet a satisfactory level of implementation of the agreed international standards on tax transparency and look forward to an updated list by the OECD by our next Summit reflecting further progress made towards implementation. Defensive measures will be considered against listed jurisdictions. We continue to support assistance to developing countries in building their tax capacity. We are also working on enhancing tax certainty and with the OECD on the tax challenges raised by digitalisation of the economy. As an important tool in our fight against corruption, tax evasion, terrorist financing and money laundering, we will advance the effective implementation of the international standards on transparency and beneficial ownership of legal persons and legal arrangements, including the availability of information in the domestic and crossborder context.

Will the G20 ever end the global problem of tax avoidance and tax evasion?

Ahead of the G20 Summit in Hamburg this week our own George Turner has published this op-ed in the German newspaper Die Tageszeitung today. The article discusses why, despite sustained political engagement from world leaders, we are still some way from solving the problem of tax avoidance and tax evasion. Here’s an English translation of the article:

Tax Justice Annual Conference 2017, 5-6 July: Final Programme

June 29, 2017   Blog, Events, TJN

#tjn17

GLOBAL TAX JUSTICE AT A CROSSROADS

SOUTHERN LEADERSHIP AND THE

CHALLENGES OF TRUMP AND BREXIT

City, University of London, 5-6 July 2017

The Association for Accountancy & Business Affairs (AABA), City, University of London (CityPERC), and the Tax Justice Network (TJN), are delighted to confirm the programme for next week’s annual conference – the latest in an annual event series dating back to 2003. The events bring together researchers, academics, journalists, policy staff of civil society organisations, consultants and professionals, elected politicians and their researchers, government and international organisation officials. The purpose is to facilitate research, open-minded debate and discussion, and to generate ideas and proposals to inform and shape political initiatives and mobilisation.

Registration (last few places)

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/global-tax-justice-at-a-crossroads-tjn-aaba-annual-conference-2017-tickets-31976056245

There is a small charge for attendance and refreshments during the two days. For more information contact: fariya@taxjustice.net 

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