Archive : Tag

Tax haven UK? It already is…

January 24, 2017   Blog, Race to the Bottom, Tax Wars

There has been much talk of the threats from the British Chancellor to turn the UK into a full-blown tax haven post-Brexit if the European Union doesn’t give it a good trade deal. We discussed ‘Brexit threats’ in our January podcast. Now our Director Alex Cobham has written an article for Politico on how, contrary to how it may appear, Brexit actually gives Brussels more power to address British tax and financial secrecy.

Beneficial Ownership and disclosure of trusts: challenging the privacy arguments

December 7, 2016   Blog, Financial Regulation, Secrecy

On July 22nd, 2016 the French supreme constitutional court ruled on a case brought by a US American citizen resident in France who had created a trust, allegedly to distribute her inheritance. She was contesting moves by France to set up a public register of trusts connected to France in an attempt to tackle tax fraud and serious economic and financial crime[1]. So, what does this mean for transparency and tax justice?

EU Leaks – a new platform for whistleblowers

September 28, 2016   Blog, Tax and corporate responsibility
Antoine Deltour, Luxleaks whistleblower

Antoine Deltour, Luxleaks whistleblower

From the Greens / Europe Free Alliance in the European Parliament, a new initiative called EU Leaks:

EUleaks is a European platform where you can submit information in a highly secure and anonymous way.

Transparency and accountability are essential for democratic governance. The EUleaks project provides a platform for increasing transparency by providing a new tool for information in the public interest to be made available. EUleaks offers a venue for the realisation of freedom of expression as a fundamental right.

This comes in the context of a story which is summarised in a Guardian headline: Panama Papers: European parliament opens inquiry. (That is a fascinating story in its own right.)

More on EU Leaks from the website of Sven Giegold, who is a founder of the EU Leaks project (and a founder of TJN too, as it happens):

Apple’s tax affairs: a symptom of the robber-baron culture

Updated with further information about Brazil’s decision – see below.

Now also on Angry Bear, Middle Class Political Economist

From the Financial Times:

corporate-america

More precisely, a group of 185 American CEOs has sent letters, co-ordinated by the Business Roundtable lobby group, to the leaders of 28 EU member states to try and get the European Commission to row back from claiming €13bn in underpaid taxes from Apple. They call the attempt a “grievous self-inflicted wound”.

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