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Evading Tax and Avoiding Tax Evasion: for decades British governments have shied away from tackling cross border crime

May 19, 2017   Blog, Corruption, Secrecy, Tax Havens

Guest blog authored by Dr Michael Woodiwiss (Arts and Cultural Industries, University of the West of England) and Dr Mary Alice Young (Bristol Law School, University of the West of England)

Al Capone: tax evader

Al Capone: tax evader

In the 1920s, an embryonic tax collecting organisation was steadily growing in the US. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) was an agency ignored by the majority of Americans. However, the tide turned in 1931 when the IRS secured the conviction of Chicago gangster Al Capone for tax evasion.

The U.K. post-general election: strong, stable and still kind to criminals

May 10, 2017   Blog, Corruption, Tax Havens

The British Prime Minister Theresa May has called a snap general election. We’d like to share with you the thoughts of Dr Mary Alice Young (Bristol Law School, University of the West of England) and Dr Michael Woodiwiss (Arts and Cultural Industries, University of the West of England) on the implications for the UK’s secrecy jurisdictions or satellite havens and for corruption opportunities globally:

Forthcoming book: Tax Havens and International Human Rights Law

May 8, 2017   Blog, Human Rights, Tax Havens

yTax havens cause enormous damage, not least because they block governments from fulfilling their human rights obligations.  When rich people and powerful businesses evade paying taxes by using offshore tax havens they deprive states of the revenues they need to deliver on their commitments to provide education, health, justice and security.  In this forthcoming book, Isle of Man-based lawyer Paul Beckett takes a human rights-based approach to the uses of tax havens and considers how the governments of tax havens actively connive with the process of breaching human rights. 

Why taxation STILL isn’t theft…

April 28, 2017   Blog, Human Rights

It came to our attention recently that a blog written for us by Associate Professor of Philosophy at Central European University Philip Goff prompted extensive discussion. The blog was called No, it’s not your money: why taxation isn’t theft. This concept that taxes paid by individuals and companies, used by government for the provision of public services are somehow ‘theft’ seems to excite a lot of people.

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